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UCOR 102: Imaginative Literature and Critical Writing (Wright): Citation

This guide will connect students in Dr. Wright's section of UCOR 102 to sources for their research on Cormac McCarthy's "No Country for Old Men"

A Rule of Thumb...

Keep in mind this handy rule of thumb:

"When in doubt, CITE IT!"

It is never wrong to cite something. If you ever find yourself in a situation where you are not sure if you need to cite particular information (is it common knowledge or not?), cite it.  That is the safest thing to do.

MLA Purdue OWL

For citation questions not answered by the documents on this page, you will find a very detailed treatment of MLA (7th edition) format is at the Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL) website.

Other Citation Helps

The Gumberg Library has also created a document that compares MLA and APA formats and gives more in-depth information on using them in bibliographies than does the DU Writing Center's "Reference List" document in the box above.

Citing Articles from Literature Resource Center and LION

Click the link below to see a document describing how to cite articles from Literature Resource Center and LION in MLA format (7th edition).

Citing Books from ebrary

Click the link below to see how to cite a book from ebrary (or another ebook vendor) in MLA format (7th edition).

Paraphrasing and Summarizing

In writing papers, you will often want to use exact quotes, especially when you cannot improve upon an author's original way of stating an idea. In those instances, of course, you should use the exact quotation, correctly citing it as the work of someone else.

But a paper cannot be written by simply stringing together exact quotations from a number of authors. More often than not, in writing you will do more stating the ideas of others in your own words, that is you will paraphase or summarize those ideas of other people.

Paraphrases and summaries of other people's ideas must also be cited, or you will be charged with plarigaism. Plagiarism is not just the using of other people's exact words without giving them credit, but also using their uniques ideas without citing them as the source. Because correct paraphrasing and summarizing can often be confusing to students, the Duquesne University Writing Center has created a handout on these topics. To see a PDF of it, click on the link below.

Paraphrasing, Summarizing, and Quoting