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The Stoics: Home

Bust of Marcus Aurelius (lived 121-180), in the Glyptothek, Munich. Photo by Bibl Saint-Pol. Public domain. Source: Wikimedia Commons


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Welcome to this research guide designed to introduce students to the school of philosophy known as Stoicism.  According to the Dictionary of Philosophy, Stoicism is:

"A philosophy named after the Stoa Poikile, a hall in Athens where it was first promulgated around 300  BC by Zeno of Citium. Stoicism, especially in its definitive formulation by Chryssipus (280-207 BC), was rigorously systematic. Its logic, ethics, and physics were united by a pervasive concept, deriving ultimately from Heraclitus, of logos. For the Stoics, the principles of rational discourse studied in logic reflect the processes of cosmic Reason studied by natural philosophy (Nature and Reason - like Fate, Providence, and God - all refer in fact to the same agency), while a 'life consistent with Nature' and with Reason is the goal of human existence."

For good introductory articles on the Stoics, click the links directly below:

Stoicism (from Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

Stoicism (from Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)


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